Hongkong Daily Press.


Hongkong, Wednesday, June 24th, 1925.
中華民國十四年六月廿四號 禮拜三
乙丑年五月初四日

No. 20,896

第二萬零八百九十六號
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HONGKONG STRIKE GRADUALLY GROWING.
EUROPEAN COMMUNITY WORKING SPLENDIDLY TO COPE WITH THE SITUATION.
WHAT WILL THE DRAGON FESTIVAL BRING?
BOY SCOUTS' LOYAL ASSISTANCE.

   The Hongkong strike, which assumed a definite form on Sunday last, did not extend to any very appreciable extent yesterday. Chinese workers in various branches of industry are still joining the ranks of those who have already struck, but they are doing so for the present only in small numbers.
   The Dragon Festival in celebrated tomorrow. Some may be waiting until then before deciding what course to pursue. If the Chinese workers at their posts after that Festival it may be taken for granted that the strike will never become general.
   As matters stand, today, the European community are working splendidly together, and dealing with the situation with a firmness and efficiency, and in a spirit of mutual help and endeavour, which are highly encouraging.
   In view of the critical nature of the situation, H.E. the Governor has postponed his departure from the Colony. He made a reference to this matter and to the strike generally at yesterday's meeting of the Legislative Council, and a report of his statement is included in today's issue of this paper.

BOY SCOUTS' GOOD WORK.

   Scouts under the organization and supervision of the Rev. G.T.Waldegrave (Scout Commissioner) assisted by the various scoutmasters, etc., are rendering valuable assistance in many ways, acting as messengers, and carrying out many useful duties at different centres.

THE HOSPITALS.

   With regard to the Hospitals, the position is practically unchanged.
   Enquiries made at the Government Civil Hospital and the French Convent Hospital at Causeway Bay, showed that the staffs at both institutions remain at work and there appears to be no sign of their leaving.
   At the Victoria Hospital there was no change, and all the staff remain at their posts.
   At the Peak Hospital six Chinese ward attendants are away, leaving the institution with the boys and two nursing amahs and 22 patients. The places of the strikers at this hospital have been taken by Boy Scouts, who are rendering valuable service.
   Strikers numbering fifty are absent from the Matilda Hospital and these include amahs, cook boys, coolies and boiler men. Volunteers, however, have come forward and the work is being carried on willingly, smoothly, and as well as possible. The hospital is full of patients and these are assisting the staff as far as it lies in their power. Two lady helpers have come in and help is also being rendered by a detachment of Boy Scouts of whose services Dr. Sanders speaks very highly.