The China Mail.


Hongkong, Tuesday, December 8, 1925.

No. 19,670
Page 7

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OUR SCOUTS.
PROVING TRUE TO THEIR TRADITIONS.
STRIKE WORK.

   The work of the Boy Scouts during the month when labour was withdrawn from Hongkong is referred to in the "Silver Wolf," the first number to be issued since the organisation was put at the service of the public during that time.
   The Commissioner writes as follows:- The splendid number of Scouts who volunteered from the very commencement of the trouble for special services was an inspiration in itself, especially in view of the fact that very many scouts were sent away by their parents at once, in anticipation of dangers which fortunately did not arise owing to the effort made by all sane and loyal members of the Community to see that order was preserved.
   In the last few weeks have come many letters of appreciation of the services rendered, showing that Scouts have proved true to the general reputation and tradition of the Brotherhood.

   From the point of view of the Scouts themselves, the time has been full of benefit for it has enabled them to put their training to the valuable test of practical experience, and many have now acquired a more than theoretical knowledge of First Aid work. Also Scout Activities have been wide spread for many took the chance offered by the C.F.R. and in so doing were able to get a broader view of the world by their fleeting visits to Japan and Canada.

PO HING FONG.

   That Scouting is now generally recognised in a real unit in the life of the Colony not only by official but also by public at large is shown by the fact that at the Po Hing Fong Disaster, a Scoutmaster found two non scouts, one a lad and the other a man, using an imitation of Scout Uniform or a Scout Badge picked up somewhere as a passport to the scene of operations.
   In addition to the Commissioner’s letter there are interesting articles, one referring to the preparation of a site at Junk bay as a future training ground, troop poles, and references to the departure of Sir R.E.Stubbs and Sir Claud Severn who had taken a keen interest in the work.