The China Mail.


Hongkong, Thursday, August 8, 1929.
大英八月八號  禮拜四日
中華民國已巳年七月初四日

No. 27,252
Page 1

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BARKER'S BUNGALOW PURCHASED
FOR BOY SCOUTS
COMMISSIONER UNFOLDS DETAIL OF SCHEME
IDEAL CAMPING ISLAND

   Those who last evening attended the concert at the St. Patrick's Club concert hall, given in aid of the Group Funds of the 16th Hong Kong Group (Catholic Cathedral) Boy Scouts, were let into a Scout secret by the local Commissioner, the Rev. G.T.Waldegrave, who announced that the local Boy Scouts' Association had bought "Barker's Bungalow" on the little island at Saiwan. It was the intention to use the island as a training quarter for Scoutmasters, whilst little sites would also be laid out on the island as camping ground for the Scouts.

Week End Camps

   This would mean that Scouts from any Group would be able to camp out during any weekend, and thus have a better opportunity of practising Scout craft. All a group of Scouts had to do was to apply to Headquarters for a site to be allotted them for a weekend, and they would find tents and other camping outfit, including cooking utensils, at their disposal, supplied by the Association and kept on the island for their use.
   All the Scouts had to bring along was their own food, and if they were prepared to eat rice and what fish they could catch from the sea, a weekend on the island would require very little outlay of money on the part of a Scout. It would mean only 10 cents, in fact, for tram fare to and from the Shaukiwan tram terminus.

Public Appeal Intended.

   Mr. Waldegrave added that before all this could be accomplished, however, there must be an outlay of a good bit of money. He would not say just then how much money they wanted, but soon a public appeal for funds would be made, and he hoped that the public generally would give the Scouts' Association the same hearty support which those in the hall had accorded to the 16th Group.
   Scouts, Mr. Waldegrave said, could not beg for money; they had to earn all they required; but there was nothing to prevent officers, specially the Commissioner, from begging, and he (the speaker) was confident that he would get the money he wanted.