Hongkong Sunday Herald.


Hongkong, Sunday, August 11, 1929.
英一千九百二十九年八月十一號

中華民國十八年 歲次己巳年 七月初七日

Vol. VI. No. 284.
Page 8

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Windfall For The Boy Scouts

THE past week has been memorable in the history of Boy Scouts the world over by reason of the high honour conferred by His Majesty the king on the Chief Scout, Sir Robert Baden Powell on the occasion of the great Jamboree. The week shall always be memorable in the annals of the local Boy Scout movement also by reason of the public announcement of the acquisition on behalf of the Scouts of Barker's Island at Saiwan.
   This acquisition has been made possible by reason not alone of the sagacity of the Commissioner and Council of the Boy Scouts here but through the liberality of the Government grant. Here, "for ever and a day," the Boy Scouts can engage in the fullest possible programme of their well known activities, moulding and building up Character, Discipline, and Manhood and Physique in boys of all ages, all who are willing to pledge themselves to do that one good turn a day that helps to leaven humanity around them and make the world better for the Boy Scout movement.
   Barker's Bungalow or "Island" at Saiwan has fallen into the lap of the Boy Scouts as a windfall. It is more than that. It may be regarded by succeeding generations of Boy Scouts here as a glorious heritage in the greatest of all great causes amongst the young - the young who are being trained up in the right way to be the best type of citizens of the future. It is, or rather will be, a heritage to be zealously guarded and preserved. It is a heritage that will make history in the movement in this Colony. Within their own sacred preserves, away from the disturbing influence of intruders and vandals, all the requirements of Camp life can be carried on throughout the whole year - at the cost of only a ten cents tram fare there and back.
   The grounds are commodious enough to meet every want of the Boy Scout for decades to come. Every conceivable hobby can be pursued in the open air without let or hindrance - but rather with every possible guidance and encouragement. The wide expanse of the sea, with all its glories and all its wonders, is there for the Sea Scouts to carry out their nautical work and their nautical play. With the addition of a hulk there is no end to the possibilities ahead of the Sea Scouts. With the growing public interest in the Boy Scout movement, perhaps it may only require a gentle hint to some generous philanthropist to ensure the procuring of a hulk for the new centre of work at Saiwan.

   It may be said without exaggeration that once Barker's Bungalow and its immense grounds are in ship shape order for the reception of the Boy Scouts the movement in the Colony will receive a tremendous impetus that cannot but have its repercussions on the branches elsewhere in the Orient, and even further afield. Greater things, too, will be expected of the Boy Scout movement here, but with the fine spirit of the Chief Scout and founder ever before them it can confidently be anticipated that all - Commissioners, Scout Masters, Scouts, Rovers, and Cubs - will in deed and in word demonstrate that they are a power for good to be reckoned with in the communal life of the Colony as a whole.